Seared Steaks With Bagna Càuda, Cauliflower and Radishes

with Chef Robert Larios
Photography by Patricia M. Larios

Here is an Italian-inspired dish using a sauce called bagna càuda, which means “hot bath,” by basting steak in flavorful blend of extra virgin olive oil, garlic and anchovy. Ribeye and filet mignon cuts work well in this recipe, too, but here I use the top sirloin.

¡Buen provecho!



RECIPE: Seared Steaks With Bagna Càuda, Cauliflower and Radishes

Yields2 Servings

 45 sprigs organic fresh flat-leaf parsley
 2 top sirloin steaks (about 5 ounces each)
 Bagna càuda (Mix in cup: quarter-cup extra virgin olive oil; 1 tablespoon anchovy paste;
 2 cloves garlic; pinch of kosher salt; pinch of fresh black pepper)
 3 organic scallions
 ¼ lb organic grape or cherry tomatoes
 34 organic radishes (about quarter-pound total)
 ½ head organic cauliflower

1

Wash produce before use.

2

Step 1: Prep and cook the steaks and bagna càuda.

Strip the parsley leaves from the stems; coarsely chop the leaves. Set aside half for garnish.

Pat the steaks dry with a paper towel; season generously with salt and pepper.

For top sirloins and filet mignons:
In a large frying pan over medium-high heat, warm 1 to 2 tablespoons oil until hot but not smoking. Add the steaks and cook, turning frequently until well browned but still rare, 5 to 6 minutes for top sirloins and 7 to 10 minutes for filet mignons. Add the bagna càuda, half the parsley and 1 tablespoon ghee or butter, if using, and cook, spooning the sauce over the steaks until fragrant and warmed through and the steaks are medium-rare, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the heat.

Transfer the steaks to a cutting board to rest for 5 minutes, then cut into half-inch-thick slices. Season the bagna càuda to taste with salt and pepper; set aside in the pan for serving.

While the steaks cook and rest, start preparing the vegetables.

3

Step 2: Prep and cook the vegetables.

• Trim the root ends from the scallions; cut the scallions into 1-inch lengths.
• Cut the tomatoes in half.
• Cut the radishes lengthwise into quarters.
• Cut the cauliflower into 1-inch florets, discarding any leaves or thick stalks.

In a large frying pan over medium-high heat, warm 1 to 2 teaspoons oil until hot but not smoking. Add the scallions, tomatoes and radishes. Cut with sides down, season with salt and pepper, and cook without stirring until starting to brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the cauliflower and cook until starting to brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons (quarter-cup) water, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the cauliflower starts to soften, the tomatoes have broken down slightly, and the scallions and radishes are just tender, 2 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and season to taste with salt and pepper.

4

Serve!

Transfer the steaks and vegetables to individual plates and spoon the bagna càuda over the steaks. Garnish with the remaining parsley and serve.

Ingredients

 45 sprigs organic fresh flat-leaf parsley
 2 top sirloin steaks (about 5 ounces each)
 Bagna càuda (Mix in cup: quarter-cup extra virgin olive oil; 1 tablespoon anchovy paste;
 2 cloves garlic; pinch of kosher salt; pinch of fresh black pepper)
 3 organic scallions
 ¼ lb organic grape or cherry tomatoes
 34 organic radishes (about quarter-pound total)
 ½ head organic cauliflower

Directions

1

Wash produce before use.

2

Step 1: Prep and cook the steaks and bagna càuda.

Strip the parsley leaves from the stems; coarsely chop the leaves. Set aside half for garnish.

Pat the steaks dry with a paper towel; season generously with salt and pepper.

For top sirloins and filet mignons:
In a large frying pan over medium-high heat, warm 1 to 2 tablespoons oil until hot but not smoking. Add the steaks and cook, turning frequently until well browned but still rare, 5 to 6 minutes for top sirloins and 7 to 10 minutes for filet mignons. Add the bagna càuda, half the parsley and 1 tablespoon ghee or butter, if using, and cook, spooning the sauce over the steaks until fragrant and warmed through and the steaks are medium-rare, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the heat.

Transfer the steaks to a cutting board to rest for 5 minutes, then cut into half-inch-thick slices. Season the bagna càuda to taste with salt and pepper; set aside in the pan for serving.

While the steaks cook and rest, start preparing the vegetables.

3

Step 2: Prep and cook the vegetables.

• Trim the root ends from the scallions; cut the scallions into 1-inch lengths.
• Cut the tomatoes in half.
• Cut the radishes lengthwise into quarters.
• Cut the cauliflower into 1-inch florets, discarding any leaves or thick stalks.

In a large frying pan over medium-high heat, warm 1 to 2 teaspoons oil until hot but not smoking. Add the scallions, tomatoes and radishes. Cut with sides down, season with salt and pepper, and cook without stirring until starting to brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the cauliflower and cook until starting to brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons (quarter-cup) water, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the cauliflower starts to soften, the tomatoes have broken down slightly, and the scallions and radishes are just tender, 2 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and season to taste with salt and pepper.

4

Serve!

Transfer the steaks and vegetables to individual plates and spoon the bagna càuda over the steaks. Garnish with the remaining parsley and serve.

Seared Steaks With Bagna Càuda, Cauliflower and Radishes

Food Lover’s Dictionary

Bagna cauda (caôda) [BAHN-yah KOW-dah] – A specialty of Piedmont, Italy, is a sauce made of olive oil, butter, garlic and anchovies. It’s served warm as an appetizer with raw vegetables for dipping. The term comes from bagno caldo, Italian for “hot bath.”


Bibliography: Copyright Barron’s Educational Services, Inc. 2009, adapted from The New Food Lover’s Companion, 2007, by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst.

Seared steaks with bagna càuda, cauliflower, and radishes. 2019. (Accessed June 25, 2019). https://sunbasket.com/recipe/seared-steaks-with-bagna-cauda-cauliflower-and-radishes

Food Quote:

“The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later, you’re hungry again.” — George Miller

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